Category Archive: Abstracts Third edition

How can Psychology and Counselling be agents of change for Aboriginal Australians?

Frankie Merritt [1], The University of Notre Dame Australia                                                                  My PhD thesis is about decolonisation and empowerment; it is specifically about First Nations people claiming …

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Book review for Jon Frew and Michael D. Spiegler Contemporary psychotherapies for a diverse world (first revised edition)

Elizabeth Day, The Australian College of Applied Psychology   In this hefty textbook, running to over 600 pages after its first revision, Frew and Spiegler have managed to produce an excellent resource for students and practitioners curious about contemporary psychotherapy and counselling as they are practised in the USA.  Aimed at graduate students in North America, …

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Book review for Oliver James’s Love Bombing: Resetting Your Child’s Emotional Thermostat

Pia Cerveri   Oliver James takes a refreshing approach to raising children in a time when parents are bombarded with techniques ranging from absurd, impossible, cruel and so lofty the ideals are impossible to achieve. His 2012 book, Love Bombing: Resetting Your Child’s Emotional Thermostat is a great read, accessible, plain speaking and compassionate. I enjoyed this book. …

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Book Review for Petra Bueskens (ed.) Mothering & Psychoanalysis. Clinical, Sociological and Feminist Perspectives

Amanda de Clifford, PhD candidate, University of Western Sydney   Between the routines and rituals of mothering I seek out Petra Bueskens’ collection of essays, reaching for its enigmatic cover that features a woman draped in newspaper text, bearing one breast, holding a glass of water in one hand and a leaf in the other, while …

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Client preferences: building bridges between therapy and everyday life

John McLeod [1], University of Abertay, Scotland                                                                                                Abstract Recent research …

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Psychotherapy and counselling in Australia: Profiling our philosophical heritage for therapeutic effectiveness

Elizabeth Day [1], Australian College of Applied Psychology                                                                                                  …

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Vision for the future? The contribution of the Psychotherapy and Counselling Federation of Australia to the profession

Ione Lewis  [1], Australian College of Applied Psychology   The author of this article served as President of PACFA for four years from 2010 to 2014, and is the immediate Past President. She was a member of the group that founded PACFA and a Board member in the 1990s. This long experience with establishing and progressing …

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The effectiveness of body-oriented psychotherapy: A review of the literature

Alexandra Bloch-Atefi and Julie Smith [1] Melbourne, Victoria, Australia                                                                                               Abstract The purpose of …

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Book Review for Susan Pollock, Thomas Pedulla and Ronald D. Siegel ‘Sitting Together – Essential Skills for Mindfulness-Based Psychotherapy

Ann Moir-Bussy, University of Sunshine Coast   This book is a unique and excellent resource for any clinician of psychotherapy and counselling and for all counsellor educators who want to engage their students in becoming mindful therapists. There are now numerous books being written about the positive effects of practicing mindfulness. This particular book is indeed …

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Book Review for Morris Eagle’s Attachment and Psychoanalysis: Theory, Research and Clinical Implications (Guilford Press, 2013)

John Meteyard, Senior Lecturer, Christian Heritage College   As recently as 2001, well known attachment theory researcher and author, Peter Fonagy, noted that there has been a tradition of “bad blood” between the disciplines of psychoanalysis and attachment theory. This unfortunate feud appears to stem back to at least the early 1960s and the now famous dismissal of …

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Spiritual Connectedness and Healing

David Tacey,  La Trobe University, Melbourne   The Australian context In 1953 the Sydney anthropologist Bill Stanner wrote an essay called “The Dreaming”. In this essay he quoted an Aboriginal elder whom he had met on an excursion into central Australia. The elder said:  White man got no dreaming,Him go ‘nother way.White man, him go …

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Identifying client emotional signatures: Development of a new scale

Michelle Webster [1], Institute for Emotionally Focused Therapy and Julie Fitness [2], Macquarie University   Abstract This article describes the development and refinement of the Annandale Emotional Signature Scale; a measure that was subsequently employed as part of a battery of tests to explore the validity of the constructs of abandonment and annihilation. The Annandale Emotional Signature Scale …

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Counselling and Psychotherapy: Professionalisation in the Australian Context

Denis J. O’Hara, Australian College of Applied Psychology, Brisbane, Australia and E. Fiona O’Hara, University of the Sunshine Coast, Sippy Downs, Australia   Abstract Counsellors and psychotherapists contribute significantly to the mental health and well-being of communities around the world but have struggled to establish professional recognition more so than other mental health professionals. While the struggle for …

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Book Review for Denis O’Hara Hope in counselling and psychotherapy

Jenny Coburn, Lecturer [1], Australian College of Applied Psychology    Associate Professor Denis O’Hara’s first book examines the role of hope in healing and personal growth, and argues that hope takes a central position both in life, and in the process of therapeutic change.  He notes that despite hope being recognised as one of the “common factors in therapeutic …

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Book review for James Morrison’s DSM-5 Made Easy: The clinician’s guide to diagnosis

Sally V. Hunter, University of New England, Australia   This review is written for those of you who believe that the DSM-5 has a place in your practice. I don’t intend to critique the DSM-5 itself or to reflect on the ways in which it is better or worse than the DSM-IV-TR. I want to …

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