Category Archive: Articles, Fifth Edition – Volume 5, No. 1, July 2017

So, you think your counselling practices are collaborative?

  Return to Journal Articles Anne Hollingworth, PsyD, Clinical and Forensic Psychologist, Private Practice, New South Wales.   Introduction As noted by Andrew, Farhall, Ong & Waddell (2009) in recent times the delivery of mental health services in Australia features collaboration as a matter of both policy (e.g. National Mental Health Strategy, 2002) and action …

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Grief and the Expressive Arts: Practices for Creating Meaning. Barbara E. Thompson and Robert A. Neimeyer (Eds.). New York, NY: Routledge, 2014, 312 pp.

Return to Journal Articles Reviewed by: Ione Lewis, PhD, PACFA Research Committee Chair, Grief Journeys Facilitator, Private Practice, Wollongong, New South Wales   Grief is a universal experience, yet is insufficiently understood in counselling and psychotherapy. Loss is not an experience to be solved or resolved. Grieving has no clear end, and fostering acceptance does …

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Application of Kohut in Public Mental Health: Understanding Fatima

Return to Journal Articles Julia Jamaludin, MBBS, MPsych, Cairns, Queensland   Kohut’s Self Psychology: Contemporary versus Traditional Theory In 1971, Heinz Kohut published a book titled The Analysis of Self that revolutionised psychoanalysis and created a paradigm shift in traditional Freudian concepts (Baker & Baker, 1987; Lee & Miller, 1991). Kohut termed his theory a …

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A Literature Review of the Evidence for the Effectiveness of Experiential Psychotherapies

Return to Journal Articles Ben Mullings, PhD, Private Practice, Perth, Western Australia   Introduction Experiential psychotherapies originate from the humanistic tradition. This class of approaches include emotion-focused, existential, person-centred, gestalt, psychodrama, focusing-oriented, and expressive therapies. Experiential approaches share a set of core qualities, such as eliciting and exploring reflective experiences in-session, using empathy within the …

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Intimate Relationships and Chronic Illness: A literature review for counsellors and couple therapists

Return to Journal Articles Rebecca M. Gray, PhD, Relationships Australia New South Wales; Toby Newton-John, PhD, University of Technology Sydney; Jamie Lee, PhD; Claire Ralfs, PhD, Relationships Australia South Australia  Introduction This paper reports on findings from a scoping literature review conducted on chronic physical illness and intimate relationships, with a view to presenting a set of clinical implications for …

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The Core Sensitivities: A clinical evolution of Masterson’s Disorders of Self

Return to Journal Articles Brooke E. Poulsen, DClinPsych, and Joseph J. Coyne, MClinPsych, School of Psychology and Counselling, Queensland University of Technology, Brisbane, Queensland   Introduction Attachment theory has increasingly underpinned therapeutic interventions for both adults and families (Daniel, 2006; Diamond et al, 2010; Maramosh, 2015; Mikulincer, Shaver & Berant, 2013). An example emerging over …

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Motivational Interviewing and School Misbehaviour: An evidenced-based approach to working with at-risk adolescents

  Return to Journal Articles David Mander, PhD, Edith Cowan University, Mount Lawley, Western Australia   Introduction Policy and practice on how best to manage and intervene with persistent misbehaviour at school by older adolescent students remains an ongoing concern for staff in many secondary schools across Australia (Sullivan, Johnson, Owens, & Conway, 2014). Indeed, …

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