Monthly Archive: August 2020

The Talking Cure: Normal People, Their Struggles and the Life-Changing Power of Therapy (2019) by Gillian Straker and Jacqui Winship. Sydney, Australia: Pan Macmillan Australia. ISBN-10: 1760781169; ISBN-13: 978-1760781163.

Return to Articles Reviewed by: Jennifer English, B. BSc., Dip. Ed., B. Ed. (Counselling), AHPRA registered counselling psychologist (Victoria).   The Talking Cure is written by two Sydney-based, highly-skilled, and experienced psychotherapists and supervisors, with Professor Straker also having academic experience. The book highlights an approach that the authors call “relational psychotherapy,” a term they …

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Reflective practice in the art and science of counselling: A scoping review

Donnalee Taylor, PhD, Senior Lecturer, James Cook University.   Abstract In the counselling profession, reflective practice is often touted as an essential characteristic of professional development, growth, and professionalism. Yet there remain countless characterisations of what reflective practice is and how best to do it. The aim of this scoping review was to evaluate over …

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Reflective practice in the art and science of counselling: A scoping review

Return to Articles Donnalee Taylor, PhD, Senior Lecturer, James Cook University.   Introduction The counselling profession is considered to be a combination of art and science (Ivey, Ivey, & Zalaquett, 2018). Therefore, it would be fitting to have diverse and adaptable tools to support counsellors. Reflective practice is often touted in education, including in the …

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Using the manga/anime Naruto as graphic medicine to engage clients in conversational model therapy

Shaun Halovic, PhD, Westmead Psychotherapy Program, Cumberland Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Sydney University.   Abstract Graphic medicine holds promise for overcoming a client’s initial dismissal of psychotherapeutic treatment by improving their agency in their own treatment. Graphic medicine refers to the use of comics or graphic novels to facilitate the mutual understanding of psychotherapeutic …

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Using the manga/anime Naruto as graphic medicine to engage clients in conversational model therapy

Return to Articles Shaun Halovic, PhD, Westmead Psychotherapy Program, Cumberland Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Sydney University.   Introduction Given that much psychotherapy focuses on the negative feelings associated with symptomatology, it would be reasonable for clients to assume that their positive experiences may have little place in their psychotherapy. In this paper, I counteract …

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