Category Archive: Abstracts, Eighth Edition – Volume 8, No. 1, August, 2020

Reflective practice in the art and science of counselling: A scoping review

Donnalee Taylor, PhD, Senior Lecturer, James Cook University.   Abstract In the counselling profession, reflective practice is often touted as an essential characteristic of professional development, growth, and professionalism. Yet there remain countless characterisations of what reflective practice is and how best to do it. The aim of this scoping review was to evaluate over …

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Using the manga/anime Naruto as graphic medicine to engage clients in conversational model therapy

Shaun Halovic, PhD, Westmead Psychotherapy Program, Cumberland Hospital, and Department of Medicine, Sydney University.   Abstract Graphic medicine holds promise for overcoming a client’s initial dismissal of psychotherapeutic treatment by improving their agency in their own treatment. Graphic medicine refers to the use of comics or graphic novels to facilitate the mutual understanding of psychotherapeutic …

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Understanding the cues and strategies counsellors use to develop rapport with clients through telephone counselling

Karen Phillip, MCoun, Nathan Beel, PhD, Senior Lecturer, University of Southern Queensland, and Tanya Machin, PhD, Senior Lecturer, University of Southern Queensland.   Abstract Rapport is a critical part of the counselling process, however most existing research has examined rapport in a face-to-face context. The aim of this study was to better understand the cues …

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From Better Access to better outcomes: Integrating logotherapy with Focused Psychological Strategies

Kyra J. Dawbarn, BSc, Adv. Dip. Logotherapy, and Paul McQuillan, PhD, PsyD, Honorary Fellow, Australian Catholic University.   Abstract The Better Access to Psychiatrists, Psychologists and General Practitioners through the Medicare Benefits Schedule (Better Access) initiative was introduced by the Australian Government to improve outcomes for people with a clinically diagnosed mental health condition through evidence-based treatment. …

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Advanced empathy: A key to supporting people experiencing psychosis or other extreme states

Richard Lakeman, DNSci, Adjunct Associate Professor, Southern Cross University    Abstract The capacity to be empathic and communicate empathically are foundational skills of counselling and psychotherapy, if not all interpersonal helping endeavours. Empathy requires the capability, inclination, and capacity to take the perspective of others, appraise and understand their experiences without being overwhelmed, and communicate …

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